What do your pets do to let you or others know that they miss you?

This week, Linda traveled for a week to visit our children and her mother, sister, and nieces and nephews. Allen stayed home due to day-job responsibilities and to hold down the Anderson fort.

Our two cats, Speedy and Cuddles, while being somewhat used to Allen traveling for his job, were not prepared to have Linda gone for so long. Leaf, our cocker spaniel, was also acting oddly and anxiously.

No matter how much Allen played, walked, and talked to Leaf, it was very hard for this adopted dog to emotionally know that his “mommy” would return. Leaf missed his key anchor, his rock in life. Who would he share his daily burdens with? What lap would he rest his head on? Who would toss popcorn kernels for him to catch in mid-air?

Normally, Leaf and the cats do not get along so well, even though there has been an uneasy truce in which they now manage to tolerate each other. Not too much hissing, chasing, or sniffing. But with Linda gone, the three of them started acting differently.

Leaf, Cuddles, and Speedy began giving each other comfort. They even expressed affection with occasional nose-to-nose kisses. Their newfound closeness became more apparent the night before Linda was scheduled to return. Allen went to bed and after hearing a thump, he looked over at Linda’s side of the bed. All three animals lay side by said, fur touching, and falling asleep together.

Allen thought this was impossible with Leaf’s trust issues, but the dog lay on his back in a totally vulnerable position. Cuddles sprawled out next to him, lying on her stomach. Speedy lay next to Cuddles. They made it clear that they needed Linda to return and would seek out each other for comfort until life went back to normal.

What do your pets do to let you or others know that they miss you?

Allen and Linda Anderson
Angel Animals Network
www.angelanimals.net
angelanimals@aol.com

Note: To subscribe to the Angel Animals Story of the Week Newsletter, send a blank message to AngelAnimals-on@mail-list.com

Helping Animal Welfare Organizations

We continue to look for ways of doing more to help animal rescue and animal welfare organizations. While we already donate a portion of all our proceeds to nonprofit charities, send baskets of books for silent auctions, and speak at fundraising events, we want to expand our outreach and support.

We’re looking for corporate sponsors that want to reach the animal lovers who follow our work and read our books. Our goal is to find like-minded people in the corporate world who would get involved with us in helping nonprofit animal charities. If you have contacts in major corporations who might want to support Angel Animals in its charitable outreach goals, be sure to email us with your suggestions and ideas.

Allen and Linda Anderson
Angel Animals Network
www.angelanimals.net
angelanimals@aol.com

Note: To subscribe to the Angel Animals Story of the Week Newsletter, send a blank message to AngelAnimals-on@mail-list.com

What does your choice of pets reveal about you?

With the start of 2010 we wanted to once again ask the basic question “What does your love of animals reveal about you?”

The following are a few highlights of a study done at the University of Oregon.

Question: Why would the University of Oregon College of Business Administration be profiling 667 pet owners?

Answer: People with pets are major players in the world of business. The pet supply industry is vitally interested in what will make you buy that designer dog dish or French day bed.

Oregon’s College of Business Administration graduate students, under the leadership of Lynn Kahle, head of the marketing department, tried to figure out what your choice of a pet says about you. With that essential information, marketers can appeal to your sensibilities and convince you that Precious really does need a plastic bowl with a lid that doubles as a Frisbee.

Here’s what they found with their questionnaire:

–Dog people tend to be more honest and forthright than most other people. They are loyal and religious;

–If you consider yourself to be a cat person, you probably are a bit of a loner yet have fairly high job satisfaction. You tend not to toe the line when it comes to the rules and rituals of an organized religion;

–People who are primarily attracted to fish as pets are more optimistic than most and not as materialistic or concerned about social status.

Kahle concludes, “A more thorough understanding of the motivations, values, and lifestyles of pet owners can help marketers design more effective advertising approaches, both for pet products and in advertisements for non-pet products.” (“We Lavish Love, Money on Our Pets Study Reveals Psyches of Animal Owners” by Ranny Green, Seattle Times, 1993)

So the gathering of this kind of data is how pet commercials are targeted directly at what excites and interests you — not your animal companion.

Well, we have a slightly different take on the subject. We think that not only do animals often reflect a person’s psyche, they also mirror their souls, or the amount of love in their hearts. It’s our opinion that a person who says, “I don’t like animals,” is experiencing a disconnect between the heart and the mind. Ask any animal lover and they will tell you: Animals are our hearts.

Have a little fun with two surveys we wrote that will help you gauge which type of pet most mirrors your personality.

Visit www.angelanimals.net/quiz.html for “Pet Personality Quiz”.

Visit www.beliefnet.com/Love-Family/Pets/index.aspx for “What’s Your Pet’s Personality?”

On another note, in consideration for animals who struggle to stay alive and be rescued in Haiti, remember the animal organizations that are going there to help.

To keep informed about the animal side of the situation, subscribe to the newsletter provided by www.kinshipcircle.org.

United Animal Nations and other animal welfare and rescue organizations are sending their rescue teams to Haiti. They have formed an umbrella organization called Animal Relief Coalition for Haiti (ARCH). To learn more about this and donate, go to www.uan.org/index.cfm?navid=670
Allen and Linda Anderson
Angel Animals Network
www.angelanimals.net

Note: To subscribe to the Angel Animals Story of the Week Newsletter, send a blank message to AngelAnimals-on@mail-list.com

Has one animal led you to another animal in distress?

First published by Angel Animals Story of the Week, January 23, 2010. Reprinted with permission. To subscribe to the Angel Animals Story of the Week Newsletter, send a blank message to AngelAnimals-on@mail-list.com

THE DOG WHO SAVES PUPPIES
By Michele Bonilla

Many years ago when we first moved to Florida, I could not believe all the stray dogs who were wondering around. We lived in the woods on a sparsely traveled dirt road.

One day, I was driving down a nearby street and saw a lot of puppies in the road. I had to see if I could help. As I got closer, the puppies all ran into the woods, including the mom.

I went home to get some food and water for them. As the days went on, I continued to leave food for them. Then one day I could not find them, and they were not eating the food. After looking around, I found six or seven of them under an old broken down mobile home.

Once again, I put out food and water. Still, when they saw me, they ran into the woods. Again, they disappeared. As the days dragged on, I tried to find them but with no luck. It broke my heart. How would they eat? Were they okay?

About a month later, I was out in my yard when this sweet looking dog approached me, wagging his tail. I thought, “You sure don’t like a stray. You’re so beautiful, clean, and happy.” He was a black and white spaniel and did not at all look like the other strays I had seen.

“Where on earth did you come from?” I asked him. He just wagged his tail and looked at me as if he had known me all his life. So out came the dog food and water. He ate and sat down. “Okay,” I said with a smile, “you can stay.”

At that time, I was taking daily walks to the end of the road. Everyday this dog would walk with me. I recently had open-heart surgery. Having him walk with me felt wonderful. He seemed so happy and smiling, staying by my side. It was such a comfort.

One night, when I went out to feed him, he wouldn’t eat. He kept running into the woods and then coming back to his food. “What on earth are you doing?” I thought.

I was very curious and crossed to where he ran into the woods. I could see three little faces looking at me. I recognized them as three of the puppies I had been feeding. They would not come out of the woods to eat.

This sweet dog kept going back in the woods to coax the puppies out so that they could eat. I moved back and again, my new friend returned to the woods. Suddenly the puppies came out of their hiding place. My new friend stood there and let them eat his food. What a great dog he was.

We did this routine every night for about a week or more. Every day I could get a little closer to the puppies. They soon came out on their own to eat.

Then one night, I went to feed them and saw no sign of my smiling friend. I looked all over for him. I called and called. I went down every street and searched for him for days and then weeks. My walks were not the same without him.

Through the years I have thought of him often. He came into my life during a very scary and lonely time. I was staying home after surgery. No one was around to offer companionship, and I didn’t have much to do. This dog brought me the puppies I had worried about.

I am certain he was not a stray. I can only think of one thing — he was an angel. An angel sent to those puppies and to me when we needed him most. I will never forget that beautiful angel dog. To this day I smile, driving down the road we walked together.

As for the three puppies, I named them Boomer, Princess, and Shylow. They stayed with me for a long time. They would never let anyone too close, only me, and only when they wanted me to be near.

Boomer and Princess left, but Shylow stayed with me for almost three years, on her terms. Over the years we built fences to keep our other dogs at home, but Shylow would always jump the fence and roam. One sad day a car hit her.

We tried very hard to get her to the veterinarian, but she ran into the woods. The next morning we found her in the doghouse we had built for her. She had jumped one final fence over to the Rainbow Bridge, where I am sure my angel dog awaited to guide her home.
BIO:

Michele Bonilla is a 61-year-old young lady. She is married and has two great daughters and seven grandchildren that she loves very much. Michele has six rescue dogs and five rescue cats. One of her dogs was born blind as was one of her cats. She does kitten rescues for kittens who have no moms and takes care of feral cats. She asks that everyone would have their animals neutered or spayed so there would be no more feral cats and stray dogs who have to suffer.

SOMETHING TO THING ABOUT:

Has one animal led you to another animal in distress?

Allen and Linda Anderson
Angel Animals Network
www.angelanimals.net

Note: To subscribe to the Angel Animals Story of the Week Newsletter, send a blank message to AngelAnimals-on@mail-list.com

What do the animals in your life help you see and hear that you would miss without them?

“The Dog Who Helps Me Hear” was first published in the Angel Animals Story of the Week Newsletter on January 16 2010.  Reprinted with permission. To subscribe send a blank message to AngelAnimals-on@mail-list.com.

STORY OF THE WEEK

THE DOG WHO HELPS ME HEAR
By Jennifer Warsing

Take a moment to sit down, close your eyes, and listen to your environment. What do you hear? The world is full of buzzing, beeps, rings, and whistles. Those sounds are not included in my world. Why is that, you wonder?

I am deaf and since the age of five, the “sounds” of my world consist of mere silence. In my home, the oven timer’s joyous beep continues on ignored until I am aware of the smell of burning food.

The telephone’s ring isn’t heard. Calls from family and friends go by without a friendly greeting of hello. The doorbell’s warm reminder that company awaits fails to be recognized; therefore, company comes and goes without greeting.

My nights are filled with sleeplessness and dread that the smoke detector’s lifesaving blare will signal and go by unheard. I lay awake each night consumed with fear.

One could think of it as turning down the volume for my life to zero. That is, until I found the link to my environment and my world — a chocolate Labrador retriever named Hattie. She is a hearing dog from Dogs for the Deaf, Inc.

Hattie was adopted from a shelter by Dogs for the Deaf and went through eight months of hearing dog training in order to become my ears. Hattie is trained to alert me to the oven timer, doorbell/door knock, microwave, alarm clock, telephone, smoke detector, and someone calling my name.

Hattie arrived on September 14, 2007 and has completely transformed my life. I often say, that is the day my life truly began; I have been re-born! She has created a life of many firsts for me in the two years we have been a team.

My nights are now filled with blissful sleep, because I know Hattie will alert me to the smoke detector and any impending sounds of danger. My home is no longer engulfed by the smells of burnt food, because I failed to hear the oven timer’s beep.

Company is now greeted at the door with my friendly smile and a chocolate Lab full of love. The telephone is answered with an enthusiastic hello. I no longer walk alone with a nervous gait. My steps are filled with independence, and my head is held high, thanks to my faithful companion, my ears, my Hattie.

Hattie has enabled me to transform my hearing disability into one of infinite possibilities. My home life is no longer one of fear and dread. Every crevice of my home bustles with sound, peace, love, and joy. I am fully aware of the sounds in my world. Silence no longer pervades my soul.

When I am outside, my faithful companion, my hearing dog taps me and alerts me to look up. I see a flock of geese flying overhead or a squirrel scurrying across the fence. I have “heard” birds territorially fighting over a newly built nest. A fire truck or ambulance dutifully drives by, and Hattie makes me aware of the sounds in my environment.

If ever God intended for an angel to be sent my way, he did so in tenfold. When he sent Hattie to me, he truly answered my prayers. Hattie may not have a halo or wings but she is my divine intervention. My life, my world is now full of sound, and my ears have chocolate fur, a tail, and a heart of gold!

Visit www.angelanimals.net/nlimage26.html to view an image of Jennifer and Hattie.

BIO:
Jennifer Warsing has been deaf since the age of five due to Meniere’s Disease. Hattie is a hearing dog who was trained by Dogs for the Deaf, located in Central Point, Oregon. Since Hattie’s arrival, Jennifer’s life and home are forever filled with sound and she hasn’t looked back since. Jennifer says, “Hattie is my life, my ears and my best friend! She is truly and angel in disguise.”

SOMETHING TO THING ABOUT:

What do the animals in your life help you see and hear that you would miss without them?
Allen and Linda Anderson
Angel Animals Network
www.angelanimals.net

Note: To subscribe to the Angel Animals Story of the Week Newsletter, send a blank message to AngelAnimals-on@mail-list.com

Have you been able to help a pet find a new, safe, and loving home?

Finding a New Home

When a person must separate from a pet who has been a member of the family, it can be heartbreaking. It eases the pain if the person helps the animal relocate to a new home.

We often get calls from people who must give up their pets. They are heartbroken, and the only solace they have is that someone responsible will love and care for their animal friend. Sending a beloved pet to an animal shelter, where his or her fate will be unknown, is unbearable.

This week, we received a call from a young woman who is being deployed to Kuwait in early February. She had made arrangements with someone to care for her Great Dane while she would be out of the country. The deal had fallen through. Now, she has only a few weeks to find a new home for the dog.

By now, she has enough leads to help her with this dilemma. But we wanted to share one with you in case you know someone else in her situation. Guardian Angels for Soldiers Pets, www.guardianangelsforsoldierspet.org is set up specifically to foster pets of soldiers who are leaving to serve their country.

As people age and have to move to assisted living or places that don’t allow pets and with housing foreclosures that force people out of their homes, the displacement of pets has intensified.

We encourage you to look around in your communities, churches, and neighborhoods for those who could use a paw up in finding new homes for their animal companions. It may only take a few phone calls or a bit of internet research. You could save some lives and ease the burden of those whose hearts are aching.

On another note, in consideration for animals who struggle to stay alive and be rescued in Haiti, remember the animal organizations that are going there to help.

To keep informed about the animal side of the situation, subscribe to the newsletter provided by www.kinshipcircle.org.

United Animal Nations and other animal welfare and rescue organizations are sending their rescue teams to Haiti. They have formed an umbrella organization called Animal Relief Coalition for Haiti (ARCH). To learn more about this and donate, go to www.uan.org/index.cfm?navid=670

Have you been able to help a pet find a new, safe, and loving home?

Allen and Linda Anderson
Angel Animals Network
www.angelanimals.net

Note: To subscribe to the Angel Animals Story of the Week Newsletter, send a blank message to AngelAnimals-on@mail-list.com

Who has believed in your potential when no one else could see it?

First published by Angel Animals Story of the Week, January 9, 2010. Reprinted with permission. To subscribe to the Angel Animals Story of the Week Newsletter, send a blank message to AngelAnimals-on@mail-list.com

A HORSE NAMED FREEDOM
By Kathe Campbell

A horse’s shocking year, as told to me by loving animal sanctuary folks in Montana — his ominous days before mending at my mountain ranch.

The young Mustang’s life was unruffled, his fodder and spring graze lush, while he contemplated his prime and lived near kin. The fields and pastures were seasonally green, and the rancher forked up two squares a day, lending belly comfort and warmth to the horse’s life even through winter’s chill. Then some folks arrived on the scene to take the youngster away. He left his ma and sidekicks while being prodded into a tiny horse trailer.

Life was now simpler for the gelding, no long green valleys, nobody to run the rivers with.  The hard case that bought the horse was unkind, jerking the youngin’ around while breaking him to saddle, and forcing that cussed bit.

Horse, as the new person called the Mustang, had never known about newfangled shouts, curses, and whippings that he was getting from the man’s leather quirt.  The youngster’s fare dissipated into mostly weeds and dandelions, stale ditch water, and nary one sweet handful of oats.  Worse, he stood afire under summer’s fierce rays while ogling grazing cattle across the fence.

The lady crawled upon Horse’s back for a spell, seemingly content with her new pony as they walked along the dirt road on fair afternoons.  But for an occasional cake of grass hay tossed over his rails by a kind neighbor, Horse was left to languish in the bare and dusty pen.  By summer’s end, his once sleek sorrel coat became pocked and dull, and his raw-boned hips and neck were bit through by a range of pesky chiggers.

Come evening, the man and lady screeched and hollered so loud as to make Horse’s ears twitch.  Sometimes the lady came flying off the back porch, only to lay bellerin’ in the dirt.  Often, the man became so angry, he swore and threw his fist through the window of their unholy little weather-beaten shack.

Autumn came, and the man left the place in his old rusty pickup. The weeds in Horse’s pen were done for, and yet seldom did a soul come with a cake of fodder.  Now and then the offish lady fetched a few handfuls of bunch grass from the yard, always carrying that rank bottle of lightening.  If she’d only offer to take Horse for a ride, he could easily harvest a meal from the dusty grass alongside the road, but it wasn’t to be.

The first snows saw the woman leaving early in the mornings, never seen till after dark throughout blizzards and hard freeze. She emerged nightly from her little car plumb full as a tick, mumbling nonsense as she weaved her way to the house.  Horse whinnied, cribbed on the rails, and kicked the boards, but the lady never turned the lights on or gave him a thought.  Crowbait now, and a layer of snow covering his back, icicles hung long and heavy from the Mustang’s mane.

Looking as though the half dead animal was ready for the bone orchard, a lady from the local animal sanctuary appeared. She opened Horse’s pen and ran gentle hands over his sorry body, murmuring soft sounds of love and reassurance.

Soon a horse trailer arrived, and Horse threaded his thin and weary legs up the ramp. But his knees collapsed, leaving him a crippled heap of filthy flesh and bone.  Kind folks helped him walk into a warm stall where he bedded for days with hay, oats, and fresh water. At only three years old, his way of going seemed lost, and unless salvaged, he’d be put out of his misery.

Weeks passed, and another horse trailer pulled alongside Horse’s stall. Other folks blanketed his emaciated carcass before escorting him inside.  After a long journey the doors opened to the scent of green sprouts in a field and the loping hooves of donkeys rushing to greet the pitiful wretch.  He was turned loose to the glory of it all — a barn, alfalfa hay, and clean running water when he thirsted. Horse was free.

Shivering and gasping at the sight, I saw Horse’s scrawny neck schmoozing my donkeys across the fence one early morn.  “So you’re our rescue baby, you sorrowful thing,” I tearfully whispered, caressing his head against my chest.  “We’ll bring you about.”

Horse was made welcome in a clean, straw-filled stall when he needed comfort and seclusion.  I brushed his coat daily, clipped and filed his split hooves, shared carrots, and assured him he had a home if he was a mind to stay.

He was high maintenance in the beginning and stayed for a goodly time at our ranch, high in the Montana mountains.  When we saddled up and rode the hills and forests on our big champion donkeys, Horse trailed along until he amassed the sleek coat, bulk, and muscle he was born with.

The day came when we shook hands and hugged a dear old friend as he and his small Indian grandson emerged from their truck. Horse had never seen a shave tail before and seemed taken with the boy’s tawny skin, shiny black hair, and winning smile.

The lad crawled up on Horse bareback, pulled gently on the reins, and spoke kind words as they rode the acres.  This was surely the best birthday present the youngster ever had, as the Mustang walked easily into their trailer to go home.  They called him “Freedom.”

BIO:
Kathe lives on a Montana mountain with her mammoth donkeys, a Keeshond, and a few kitties.  She is a prolific writer on Alzheimer’s, and her stories are found on many ezines.  Kathe is a contributing author to the Chicken Soup For The Soul and Cup of Comfort series, numerous anthologies, RX for Writers, and medical journals.  Email her at <kathe @ wildblue.net>

SOMETHING TO THING ABOUT:

Who has believed in your potential when no one else could see it?

Allen and Linda Anderson
Angel Animals Network
www.angelanimals.net

Note: To subscribe to the Angel Animals Story of the Week Newsletter, send a blank message to AngelAnimals-on@mail-list.com

NEW — Inspirational Writing and Publishing Today Class by Linda Anderson

You are invited to have a memorable experience in bringing your writing to a new level and meeting others who want to share insights from their lives. Linda is teaching the following class in Minneapolis. Register soon as these classes tend to fill up fast!

Inspirational Writing and Publishing Today
Instructor: Linda Anderson
Class: A668, 6 Week Class, Winter/Spring 2010
Location: Open Book (The Loft Literary Center,
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Date(s): Tuesdays, March 9 – April 13
Time(s): 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Enrollment: Open
In this spiritually hungry world, people long to be comforted and inspired. Self-help, New Thought, religious books, daily meditations, memoirs, and personal true story anthologies top the bestseller lists. In this class, you’ll learn the forms, elements, and markets for inspirational writing and read samples from masterful writers. You’ll get tips for moving from self-expression to service by writing about your life’s experiences in ways that help others. We’ll also talk about a system for framing chapters in a book-length work, or for organizing an article. This class offers nurturing feedback and suggestions for rewriting, polishing, and getting published. It includes individual review of your assignments or book in progress. For intermediate and advanced writers. 30% presentation/lecture 25% writing exercises 25% discussion and sharing of writing 20% review of master writers Instructor Information:

Linda Anderson
www.loft.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=product.display&Product_ID=2496

Linda Anderson

Announcement — New Online Pet Products Store

For a long time now, we have been looking for an easy way to raise money for animal organization. They need so much help, especially in these difficult economic times. Now, we are trying out a new project and we need your help to see if it will work.

We would like to announce our new pet products and supply store that features an array of pet products.  It is called ANGEL ANIMALS PETOPIA STORE. We invite you to visit it at http://petopia.ihostmall.com/angelanimals/.

As with all that we do, we will donate a portion of our proceeds from products sold through this store to animal shelters and organizations. 

Although we did not personally select items for the PETOPIA store, many of them would make wonderful pet products and great gifts for animals lovers!

Please visit the store this week. If you are buying these types of pet products anyway, know that by buying them at the ANGEL ANIMALS PETOPIA STORE, you will also be helping animals and nonprofit animal organizations. Enjoy your visit.

Each quarter, we will select an animal organization to receive donations from every item sold at the store and will announce the featured organization at www.angelanimals.net.

The first organization we are selecting for donations is called Basic Animal Rescue Training (BART). This is an organization that we know personally because the founder spoke at a  bookstore event we did about our animal rescue book, and we got to know and admire her work.

BART trains EMTs and fire department personnel on how to  save the lives of animals in fires and emergencies. The organization donates oxygen masks that are specially designed to help animal breathe and trains the first responders on how to use the masks. They do a great job and are working all over the country now. The more they train, the safer YOUR pets will be.

Read more about BART at (www.basicanimalrescuetraining.org).

Allen and Linda Anderson
Angel Animals Network
www.angelanimals.net

Note: To subscribe to the Angel Animals Story of the Week Newsletter, send a blank message to AngelAnimals-on@mail-list.com

How do you help your pets keep exercised and stop boredom in beyond-cold temperatures?

The Crazy Dogs of Winter

Leaf in the Snow

We wrote in a Twitter/Facebook post last week that our cocker spaniel Leaf is going bonkers with all this cold weather. He likes snow but below-zero temperatures make it too frigid for us to walk him for a long time. So he’s not getting enough exercise.

We take him for a couple hours to doggie daycare, but that can be expensive if we do it too often. So we asked people what they do. Here are some of their responses. They may help those of you who are coping with the winter crazies.

Mary T.: I have just trained my dear darling beagle on the treadmill. She happily sits and waits for me to put her collar on and then trots for 20-30 minutes. Has made ALL the difference this winter!!!

Richard O: Live in Vermont with 3+ feet of snow on the ground right now. In 2004, I put in a big doggy door leading to a covered porch, leading down 3 steps into a BIG fenced yard. Even when I’m off at work, the dogs can come and go as they please. I keep a wide path shoveled in their yard. They both love to bound around in the snow.

Bob D: We’re taking Mabel (rat terrier; no fat, little fur) to Petco and PetSmart for walks around the store and a little socialization. The staffs are very friendly and accommodating. Doesn’t replace chasing squirrels outside, but better than nothing.

Judy M: If I get desperate, I’ll do some “living room rally” and set up a few cones. Or figure 8’s using one dog as a post, and a cone as the other.

Jennifer W: My Hearing Dog, Hattie has numerous interactive toys, which I give her to play with. Sometimes I give these to her or a special chew bone, perhaps a stuffed kong. Other times we do training work indoors to keep her busy. We work on obedience and other commands. I also work on teaching her new things, so the usual commands don’t become boring. It’s a win-win situation for both of us and helps pass the time on these cold winter dreary days.

How do you help your pets keep exercised and stop boredom in beyond-cold temperatures?

Allen and Linda Anderson
Angel Animals Network
www.angelanimals.net

Note: To subscribe to the Angel Animals Story of the Week Newsletter, send a blank message to AngelAnimals-on@mail-list.com