INSPIRATIONAL WRITING AND PUBLISHING SIX-WEEK CLASS

INSPIRATIONAL WRITING AND PUBLISHING SIX-WEEK CLASS

Instructor: Linda Anderson
Age Group: Adult
Day: Wednesdays
Date: March 16 – April 20
Time: 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

In this spiritually hungry world, people long to be comforted and inspired. Self-help, New Thought, religious books, daily meditations, memoirs, and personal true story anthologies top the bestseller lists. In this class, you’ll learn the forms, elements, and markets for inspirational writing and read samples from masterful writers. You’ll get tips for moving from self-expression to service by writing about your life’s experiences in ways that help others.

We’ll also talk about a system for framing chapters in a book-length work or for organizing an article. This class offers nurturing feedback and suggestions for rewriting, polishing, and getting published. It includes individual review of your assignments or book in progress. For intermediate and advanced writers and beginning writers who want to explore the inspirational genres.

30% Lecture; 25% Writing Exercises; 25% Sharing of Student Writing; 20% Review of Master Works

Instructor: Linda Anderson
Age Group: Adult
Location: Hopkins Center for the Arts, Hopkins, Minnesota
Day: Wednesdays
Date: March 16 – April 20
Time: 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Level: Open to All Levels

Register in person at Open Book, online www.loft.org/classes-at-the-loft/register-now, by phone at 612-379-8999, by fax at 612-215-2576, or mail registration to The Loft Literary Center, Att: Education, Open Book, Suit 200, 1011 Washington Ave. So., Minneapolis, MN 55414. Registration fee (seat): $186.00

You Ought to Be in Pictures: A Screenwriter Debuts Short Stories That Would Make Great Films

You may have read one of Linda Anderson’s Angel Animals series of books as she explores the deep bond between people and their pets. But did you know that Linda also writes fiction? She’s inviting you to read her book of short stories available in E-book format.
 
Linda, an award-winning writer, takes film buffs and readers into realistic and quirky worlds where unforgettable characters with compelling conflicts come alive on the screens of imaginations. Using loglines and genres to set the tone, she presents eight unique plots and a range of engaging characters. She encourages readers to become producers (at least, in their minds) and cast the stories as full-length films and short features.
 
“Feature Length Film” stories in this collection answer the question: What if?

What if a New Jersey rowhouse wall that separates two people, who are in need of mutual redemption, reveals them to each other? What if Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio were reunited with the help of a pliable young couple who impersonate the icons? What if an act of school violence destroyed everything a dedicated teacher believed in? What if making a list of qualities for an ideal man had unexpected consequences?
 
In the “Short Features” stories section of You Ought to Be in Pictures, a grandmother in the 1950s takes on Walter Cronkite and issues a prophetic warning about media influencing the outcome of news stories. A son seeks a unique kind of revenge before his father’s demise. And a teenage nun learns about love from a dying plumber.
 
You Ought to Be in Pictures: A Screenwriter Debuts Short Stories That Would Make Great Films challenges readers to envision themselves as filmmakers and to view the book’s short stories as movies they would love seeing on the big screen. Film rights to each of the stories are available. Hollywood, are you listening?
 
You can order from Amazon.com or from the Angel Animals Network Online Bookstore.
 
Amazon Kindle:
http://www.amazon.com/You-Ought-Pictures-Screenwriter-ebook/dp/B00427YK2Q/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1285191759&sr=1-1
 
Angel Animals Online Bookstore (PDF):
http://shop.angelanimals.net/product.sc;jsessionid=A40FDAB26544F0A462E436BA6B4F1830.qscstrfrnt01?productId=23&categoryId=1

NEW — Inspirational Writing and Publishing Today Class by Linda Anderson

You are invited to have a memorable experience in bringing your writing to a new level and meeting others who want to share insights from their lives. Linda is teaching the following class in Minneapolis. Register soon as these classes tend to fill up fast!

Inspirational Writing and Publishing Today
Instructor: Linda Anderson
Class: A668, 6 Week Class, Winter/Spring 2010
Location: Open Book (The Loft Literary Center,
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Date(s): Tuesdays, March 9 – April 13
Time(s): 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Enrollment: Open
In this spiritually hungry world, people long to be comforted and inspired. Self-help, New Thought, religious books, daily meditations, memoirs, and personal true story anthologies top the bestseller lists. In this class, you’ll learn the forms, elements, and markets for inspirational writing and read samples from masterful writers. You’ll get tips for moving from self-expression to service by writing about your life’s experiences in ways that help others. We’ll also talk about a system for framing chapters in a book-length work, or for organizing an article. This class offers nurturing feedback and suggestions for rewriting, polishing, and getting published. It includes individual review of your assignments or book in progress. For intermediate and advanced writers. 30% presentation/lecture 25% writing exercises 25% discussion and sharing of writing 20% review of master writers Instructor Information:

Linda Anderson
www.loft.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=product.display&Product_ID=2496

Linda Anderson

What are favorite animal books you are reading now?

What Angel Animals Is Reading

Being authors of animal books, we are always fascinated by what others are writing on the subject. Below are some of the books we are reading and enjoying. Perhaps they will find their way to your bookshelf too.

THE INNER WORLD OF FARM ANIMALS: Their Amazing Social, Emotional, and Intellectual Capacities by Amy Hatkoff (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2009, hardcover, $19.95, 176 pages, color photos) with a foreword by Jane Goodall and afterword by Wayne Pacelle, president of the Humane Society of the United States

The jacket for this informative, entertaining, and eye-opening book says, “Chickens can count. Pigs are smarter than poodles. Cows form close friendships. Turkeys know one another by their voices, and sheep recognize faces — of other sheep, and of people. Far from lacking thoughts and feelings, barnyard creatures demonstrate sophisticated problem-solving abilities, possess rich social lives, and feel a wide range of emotions.”

Getting to know farm animals in such an intimate way as they are presented in this book offers a perfect opportunity to love them as individuals. One of our favorite stories is “Hope and Johnny: Loyal and Loving.” It’s about two pigs from Farm Sanctuary in Orland, California. They were such loyal friends that when Hope’s leg was injured and she could no longer walk, Johnny kept other pigs from bothering her when she ate. Johnny stayed by Hope’s side day and night. After Hope died of old age, Johnny, although younger and healthier, died several weeks later, presumably of a broken heart.

Because of all the time and effort we put into writing our award-winning book RESCUED: Saving Animals from Disaster, we are always interested in good books about animal rescue. MOORE TAILS: Rescuing Mutts in the South: An Intimate Portrait of Animal Rescue & Cruelty by Maureen Burke-Horansky (2009, Ink Stain Publishing Corp., $15.00, 286 pages, color photos, authormaggie@pinehurst.net) is a unique entry in this genre.

This book shares the true story of five passionate women who managed to get a local North Carolina county animal facility to allow adoptions. The women fight animal cruelty and attempt to lower the kill rate in the facility. They are creative, courageous, and persistent.

Jane Goodall writes in a letter at the end of this book about the organization the women founded, Animal Advocates of Moore County, Inc. in Pinehurst, North Carolina. “Eight women in the village of Pinehurst learned of the euthanasia crisis from articles in the local newspaper. They met to form an organization of animal lovers, choosing to take action to resolve this grim situation. They began trapping feral cats, spaying and neutering them, inoculating them against disease. Then they offered a no-cost spay-neuter program for low-income residents. . .I support what they have achieved and urge you to support them in any way you can.”

Another animal rescue book that caught our attention is GREYHOUND TALES: True Stories of Rescue, Compassion, & Love, ed. By Nora Star, Inception by Kari Mastrocola, Introduction by Susan Netboy (1997, Lost Coast Press, Order: Nora Star, 9728 Tenaya Way, Kelseyville, CA 95451 or http://www.cypresshouse.com, $15.95, 116 pages, color photos).

This anthology of stories from wonderful people who rescue and adopt greyhounds offers insight into the once multi-billion-dollar greyhound racing industry and its tragic consequences for the six-thousand-year-old greyhound breed. It includes information on how to determine if adopting a greyhound is right for you and how to join the National Greyhound Adoption Network and subscribe to the GREYHOUND NETWORK NEWS quarterly newsletter.

On the back cover Jeffrey Moussaieff Mason, author of THE EMOTIONAL LIVES OF ANIMALS writes, “The people who tell their stories in this book show sympathy and compassion for these marvelous animals who are themselves so filled with sympathy and compassion for us, even though humans have proved to be such untrue friends. Somehow these dogs still love and trust us after all our degradation and betrayal. This in itself is a small miracle.”

What are favorite animal books you are reading now?

Making the Transition from Life Journey to Inspiring Others

Making the Transition from Life Journey to Inspiring Others
Linda Anderson, www.writingontherun.com and www.angelanimals.net

Writers have a collective confession to make. If we are to be honest, we must admit that no matter what kind of hell we are going through, a small voice in our mind is saying, “This will make great writing material someday.”

In the class I have taught at The Loft Literary Center since 1998, “Inspirational Writing and Publishing Today,” I’ve had the honor of helping class members move from their painful or joyful life’s experiences to writing that inspires, informs, and uplifts others. Each class has a gem of give and take as we work together to bring out the best in each other.

My philosophy is to create a safe and sacred place where there is no judgment, and the atmosphere is nurturing and supportive. We exchange ideas and read and discuss examples from masters of the inspirational, memoir, and self-help writing genres. Through practical information that a published author learns over the years, I help to encourage a writer’s self-expression and desire for publication.

The people who take my class are individuals. They may not know how special they are, but I see a spark of divinity in each of them. They have as much (or more) to teach me, as I have to teach them. They use the exercises, techniques, and examples I give to share their life experiences from perspectives that are uniquely their own. What a gift of giving and receiving this class becomes. No wonder so many of the members have continued to meet and keep in touch long after our time together has ended.

On the evaluations that class members fill out during the last session, the comment they most often make is that this class far exceeded their expectations. This happens because I don’t view this class as one that ends. I give the members my materials and insights from writing 14 inspirational books plus hundreds of articles, blogs, and essays. I hope they can continue to refer to class materials as their writing goals form or change.

Here are some comments from previous classes:

“I love the handouts. Your choice of materials educate, enlighten, and ring true.”

“This is a safe atmosphere, non judgmental. Otherwise, I don’t think people would share what they do here.”

“I love the short assignments and the in-class writing exercises”

“I like the way we share with our classmates. Your ability to guide us to a useful form of feedback is helpful to me.”

“I appreciate hearing about your experiences and what others share about their experiences.”

“I see the format and rationale of this class a bit more clearly each week. You are very generous with your time. I am learning as well as making new friends.”

“I’m being stretched in good and productive ways through in-class writing and giving feedback.”

“The best instructor I’ve had – informative, prepared, creative, connected, professional, helpful, and caring.”

“You are quite available and responsive to requests. The one-to-one meetings are of great help.”

“I really appreciate your commitment to being of service to other writers. It is a real rarity to find someone so dedicated and professionally humble. I have bragged extensively to my writer’s group about you and your wisdom. Thank you.”

“I love the organization and fun that you gave the material and I would recommend it to others. Keep inspiring writers. It’s the greatest gift of all.”

“You’re very organized and kept right on track. The readings were great. Perhaps your class was about finishing some healing work on me before I attempt to finish the books I’m writing.”

If you’d like to join me and other writers this summer at The Loft Literary Center for a six-week “Inspirational Writing and Publishing Today” class, go to http://www.loft.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=product.display&Product_ID=2202

This class tends to fill up fast, so consider registering today. I’ll look forward to meeting you and helping you to fulfill your writing dreams.